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Letters: Monte; Sen. Clinton; Anorak Facts

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Letters: Monte; Sen. Clinton; Anorak Facts

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Letters: Monte; Sen. Clinton; Anorak Facts

Letters: Monte; Sen. Clinton; Anorak Facts

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Scott Simon dives head first into the listener e-mail bag. Topics include concern over a report on writer and producer Eric Monte; the correct way to address Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY); and the true origin of the anorak.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. Time now for your letters.

First off, more reaction to our July 29 story about Eric Monte, the former Hollywood writer and producer of Good Times and the movie Colley High. Mr. Monte has had personal reverses and has been living in the Salvation Army shelter. Alan Mannings, the former head writer and executive producer of Good Times, objected to a number of statements in this story. Mr. Manning says that all 120 episodes of Good Times credit Mr. Monte along with Michael Evans as creators of the show and that he was paid for each show even after he left it. This fact is easily confirmed on every Internet database.

Mr. Mannings objects to a number of charges in this story, but says he wishes Mr. Monte well. He adds, I do not believe that a fall from grace is accompanied by a license to distort.

Two weeks ago Ron Williams filled in for Don Shore. Susan McKinnis(ph) from Fairbanks, Alaska wrote in to observe, This morning every politician but one was called by first and last name or honorific and last name. Al Gore, John Kerry, Senator Lieberman and Ned Lamont, and Hilary. Unless you're willing to discuss Al, John, Hilary, Joe and Ned, please don't use Senator Clinton's first name in your broadcasts. You just don't know her that well and nor do I. A little respect, please.

Last week Daniel Pinkwater and I read from a new illustrated version of The Cremation of Sam McGee. I said, I don't think that had anoraks in Sam McGee's day. I think that's kind of a, you know, contemporary sporting goods invention. Boy, was I wrong. Evan Atwater of Fort Worth, Texas was among those who wrote in to advise us that anoraks were originally invented by the Inuit, a native clothing which protected them from wind chill and wet while hunting and kayaking in the Artic region. Underneath the anorak the Inuit wear warm clothes. Inuit anoraks have to be regularly soaked with fish oil to keep their water resistance. Today a jacket is named after it because it attempts to be just as waterproof.

Incidentally, we've also learned that anorak is British slang for nerd. Kind of amazing I hadn't heard that before.

Donna LaDuke(ph) of St. Petersburg, Florida says that her father used to recite the Cremation of Sam McGee at family gatherings and says, When I was 12, in an effort to please my father I managed to memorize the entire poem. When your piece came on the air I quickly called my 80-year-old father and we listened together as I held the phone to my radio.

We welcome your letters. Come to our Web site, NPR.org and click Contact Us. Please tell us where you live and how to pronounce your name, and why don't you call your mother or father too.

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