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Linking Isolated Habitats Said to Help Biodiversity

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Linking Isolated Habitats Said to Help Biodiversity

Environment

Linking Isolated Habitats Said to Help Biodiversity

Linking Isolated Habitats Said to Help Biodiversity

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5767771/5767772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Around the world, once-giant ecosystems have been cut up into tiny fragments. Islands of habitat have been left on the land that can be wiped by a single storm.

Ecologists have said for years that fragments of this kind do better when they're reconnected by thin corridors — strips of trees that lead rare plants and animals to other biodiversity "hotspots." Now there's evidence that this argument is true.