Letters: Valerie Plame, Marni Nixon We read letters from some of our listeners about last week's editors roundtable, the Valerie Plame affair, and Marni Nixon.
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Letters: Valerie Plame, Marni Nixon

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Letters: Valerie Plame, Marni Nixon

Letters: Valerie Plame, Marni Nixon

Letters: Valerie Plame, Marni Nixon

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We read letters from some of our listeners about last week's editors roundtable, the Valerie Plame affair, and Marni Nixon.

NOAH ADAMS, host:

It's time now for your letters. Our editors roundtable last week drew some criticism from Larry Nielsen(ph). He writes, As a 15-year resident of Seattle, I take issue with Joni Balter's overly bland assessment of politics in Washington State. This is not surprising, since her paper, The Seattle Times, has been consistently more conservative than the populous at large here. For example, she characterized support for the Iraq War as tepid. Mr. Nielsen writes, A truer descriptor would be nonexistent. Like Maria Cantwell, The Times tries to have it both ways, to be critical of Bush now that it's safe, but never to admit its own lack of foresight. I would hope you would be moved to delve more deeply into this race and report more truthfully on the hive of progressive political activity buzzing through western Washington and Oregon.

Daniel Schorr's commentary last week about the Valerie Plame affair and the acknowledgement that the original leak came from Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage prompted Lorna Campbell(ph) to send this missive. What hope it gives me to hear Daniel Schorr, who like many had his teeth firmly gripping the bone of conspiracy, able to let go. I always look forward to his analysis. I'm a liberal who feels the two-party system is failing us. This is a start toward honesty and letting go of gotcha politics.

And finally, Mark Musclewhite(ph) of Jacksonville, Florida wrote to complain about our segment on Marni Nixon, the woman who ghost-sang for Deborah Kerr, Audrey Hepburn and Natalie Wood in the movies. Mr. Musclewhite says, You completely failed to mention her greatest work, for which she is known even to this day. Of course I'm speaking of the association with the Randy Van Horn Singers. The Randy Van Horn Singers were the number one session singers during the late '50s and early '60s. They sang on hundreds of TV shows, commercials and theme songs. Ever hear of a little show called The Jetsons, or maybe The Flintstones? There's Marni Nixon and the Randy Van Horn Singers. Not to mention their contributions to the late great composer-arranger-performer Juan Garcia Esquivel and his many albums.

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