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Neanderthals Found to Live in More Recent Past

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Neanderthals Found to Live in More Recent Past

Research News

Neanderthals Found to Live in More Recent Past

Neanderthals Found to Live in More Recent Past

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Despite the ice age and competition from the evolving Homo sapiens, Neanderthals were able to survive for thousands of years longer than many researchers once thought. In a cave in Gibraltar, scientists found special tools known only to Neanderthals, which date to 28,000 years ago.

Scientists say the new findings mean that Neanderthals survived at least 2,000 years longer than once thought — and they had plenty of chances to mingle with Homo sapiens. Researchers believe the Gibraltar site, known as Gorham's cave, may have been the last gasp for Homo neanderthalensis.

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