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Brazilian Twins Follow Classical Music Dream

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Brazilian Twins Follow Classical Music Dream

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Brazilian Twins Follow Classical Music Dream

Brazilian Twins Follow Classical Music Dream

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Twins Wagner and Walter Caldas have been playing the violin for 10 years, initially at the insistence of their mother. Julie McCarthy, NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy, NPR

Twins Wagner and Walter Caldas have been playing the violin for 10 years, initially at the insistence of their mother.

Julie McCarthy, NPR

Jonas and Homalia Caldas in his Niteroi shop, where he makes and restores classical instruments. Julie McCarthy, NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy, NPR

Jonas and Homalia Caldas in his Niteroi shop, where he makes and restores classical instruments.

Julie McCarthy, NPR

A pair of 21-year-old twin Brazilian violinists are working their way out of poverty by playing classical music.

Wagner and Walter Caldas grew up in a poor neighborhood across the bay from Rio de Janeiro. The brothers make their American debut this week, performing with their orchestra for the Brazil Foundation in New York City.