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House Bill Would Lead to U.S.-Mexico Fence
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House Bill Would Lead to U.S.-Mexico Fence

Politics

House Bill Would Lead to U.S.-Mexico Fence

House Bill Would Lead to U.S.-Mexico Fence
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House lawmakers vote today on "The Secure Fence Act." It requires Homeland Security to prevent "all unlawful entries" into the U.S. To do that, the bill calls for constructing more than 700 miles of fencing along the border with Mexico.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

One issue - immigration - that's in a lot of campaign ads, will be debated again today in the House. Lawmakers will vote on the Secure Fence Act. It requires Homeland Security to prevent “all unlawful entries into the U.S.” To do that, the bill calls for constructing more than 700 miles of fencing along the border with Mexico.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

If all this sounds familiar, it is because the House approved the same provision last year. But if it's working, why stop there? Republican House leaders are looking to build up a strong record on border security before the midterms. So the measure will, in all likelihood, be approved again today. It faces an uncertain future in the Senate, where a bipartisan group wants to address a number of immigration issues. And so far efforts to reconcile House and Senate differences on immigration policy have left the two sides on different sides of the fence.

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