NPR logo

The Family That Squeezes Together...

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6078575/6078582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Family That Squeezes Together...

The Family That Squeezes Together...

The Family That Squeezes Together...

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6078575/6078582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Joyce Kahkonen and her daughter, Gay Kahkonen, at a StoryCorps mobile booth in Pittsburgh.

Joyce Kahkonen and her daughter, Gay Kahkonen, at a StoryCorps mobile booth in Pittsburgh. StoryCorps hide caption

toggle caption StoryCorps

Family histories are often linked to things and places, whether it's a favorite chair or a vacation spot. Joyce Kahkonen says her family was linked to a musical instrument: the accordion.

As Kahkonen tells her daughter, Gay, her father played the accordion professionally, and his enthusiasm was contagious.

From polkas to waltzes and standards, Kahkonen taught all his children to play the accordion. And they enjoyed it, Joyce recalls — so much so that they would all don accordions for a group photo.

Other than the lessons, and the sense of duty in sharing music and playing for an audience, Joyce says one piece of advice from her father has often served her well: "Honey, remember one thing: If you can't play good, play loud."

This piece was produced for 'Morning Edition' by Michael Garofalo with Katie Simon.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.