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Computer Chips Share Data with Lasers

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Computer Chips Share Data with Lasers

Technology

Computer Chips Share Data with Lasers

Computer Chips Share Data with Lasers

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Researchers in California plan to announce that they have created a silicon-based chip that can produce laser beams. The New York Times reports Monday that the development will make it possible to use laser light rather than wires to send data between chips.

LYNN NEARY, host:

On Mondays, the business report focuses on technology. Today, a new computer chip.

(Soundbite of music)

NEARY: Computer scientists are expected to announce a significant advance today. They say they've developed a chip that could make computers even faster than they already are. They would move information through flashes of laser light instead of metal wires.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

The new chip comes from Intel - which makes computer chips - and the University of California at Santa Barbara. They ran a race with chipmakers in Europe and Asia.

Their new chip will not exactly arrive on the market with the speed of light. Industry experts tell the New York Times that it could take years to commercialize the new technology.

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