U.S. TV Personality Fails to Get Name on Bridge

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The government of Hungary ran an online poll. People were invited to vote for the person who would get his or her name on a new bridge over the Danube. Tuesday night, comic Steven Colbert caught wind of the contest and instructed his viewers to vote for him. Colbert ended up with 30 percent of the vote, far ahead of any other contender. Unfortunately, he falls short on two major qualifications: He doesn't speak Hungarian and he's not dead.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

The government of Hungary ran an online poll. People were invited to vote for the person who would get his or her name on a new bridge over the Danube. Late-night comic Stephen Colbert heard of this contest and instructed his viewers to vote for him. Colbert ended up with 30 percent of the vote. That put him far ahead of any other contender. Sadly, he lacks two of the major qualifications for the honor: He does not speak Hungarian and he's not dead. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

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