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Clinton Weighs In on Detainees, Iraq and Iran

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Clinton Weighs In on Detainees, Iraq and Iran

Politics

Clinton Weighs In on Detainees, Iraq and Iran

Clinton Weighs In on Detainees, Iraq and Iran

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A Seat at the Table: The Clinton Foundation had a place alongside Chile, France and Brazil for the launch of a United Nations aid project Tuesday. Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Gettty Images hide caption

toggle caption Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Gettty Images

A Seat at the Table: The Clinton Foundation had a place alongside Chile, France and Brazil for the launch of a United Nations aid project Tuesday.

Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Gettty Images

Clinton on Iran

The current debate brings to mind the words of Israel's Yitzhak Rabin:

'You Do Not Make Peace with Your Friends'

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NPR Analysis

Washington Editor Ron Elving talks about former President Clinton's remarks on interrogation methods.

Former President Bill Clinton, one of a select few to have viewed national security from inside the Oval Office, has his own opinions about how to handle terrorism suspects.

A debate over allowing coerced testimony and reinterpreting the Geneva Conventions has raged between the White House and its Republican allies in the Senate.

President Bush says he wants "clarity" on the Geneva rules. And he said in a recent speech that the CIA has used what he called "alternative" means of interrogation.

The former president proposes a way that the commander in chief might allow rough questioning of suspects under extreme circumstances — but he is sharply against a major change in the law.

Mr. Clinton spoke to Steve Inskeep from New York, where he is hosting his Global Initiative conference.

The goal of the forum is to get corporate and government leaders to cooperate on civic and social projects.

But the suggestions range a bit beyond the scope of most municipal bonds. One project, for instance, would use money from an airline tax to pay for medications in poor countries.

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