Iraq War Fueling Terrorism, Intelligence Report Says

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U.S. soldiers inspect a car-bomb site in Baghdad i

U.S. soldiers inspect the site where a car bomb exploded in Baghdad, Sept. 24, 2006. Wisam Sami/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Wisam Sami/AFP/Getty Images
U.S. soldiers inspect a car-bomb site in Baghdad

U.S. soldiers inspect the site where a car bomb exploded in Baghdad, Sept. 24, 2006.

Wisam Sami/AFP/Getty Images

A new assessment by U.S. intelligence agencies finds that the threat of terrorism has grown since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and that the war in Iraq has spawned a new generation of violent Islamic extremists. In other words, the Iraq war made the overall terrorism problem worse.

The leaked report, a National Intelligence Estimate, represents the consensus view of 16 U.S. spy agencies. It was produced by the National Intelligence Council, a thinktank of the U.S. intelligence community.

The document is still classified but it reportedly paints Iraq as a breeding ground for Islamist radicals.

It's the first formal report that assesses the global trend of terrorism since the Iraq war began.

The leaked report is also expected to have political impact, with campaigns in the final six-week stretch.

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