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Tech Show Features Self-Destructing E-Mail
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Tech Show Features Self-Destructing E-Mail

Technology

Tech Show Features Self-Destructing E-Mail

Tech Show Features Self-Destructing E-Mail
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The Demo Fall tech show in San Diego this week features nearly 70 companies with their new products. The line-up includes a new form of e-mail that self-destructs after being read.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

On Mondays our business report focuses on technology. Today, a new tattoo ink.

(Soundbite of music)

We'll hear about that new tattoo ink that makes it easier to make tattoos disappear. First, making your e-mail messages self-destruct.

The technology, similar to e-mail, is called Vaporstream and may be coming to your computer soon. It holds a message in a holding tank until it's read. Then the message disappears for good. And it's just one of the products scheduled to be unveiled at the demo fall tech show in San Diego this week.

TiVo, Half.com and the Internet phone service Skype have launched at demo shows in the past. This year nearly 70 companies will get a mere six minutes to present their new gadgets and explain why they should be the next big thing.

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