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Replacing a Symphony Stage -- Carefully

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Replacing a Symphony Stage -- Carefully

Performing Arts

Replacing a Symphony Stage — Carefully

Replacing a Symphony Stage -- Carefully

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Symphony Hall in 1901, one year after it was built. Courtesy of Boston Symphony Orchestra hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Boston Symphony Orchestra

Symphony Hall in 1901, one year after it was built.

Courtesy of Boston Symphony Orchestra

What happens when it's time to replace the stage floor on a concert hall legendary for its acoustic perfection?

In the 105 years since the construction of Boston's Symphony Hall, its stage has become dangerously worn, with warped and creaky floorboards, many of them damaged by the endpins of cellos and basses.

The Boston Symphony has made every effort to duplicate the original stage, using the same kind of wood and installation process, and consulting with acousticians every step of the way. They're hoping to avoid the mistakes made at Carnegie Hall during its renovation. The stakes are high; the new stage will be unveiled at a concert Friday.

Andrea Shea of member station WBUR reports.

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