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Florida Raising Minimum Wage

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Florida Raising Minimum Wage

Economy

Florida Raising Minimum Wage

Florida Raising Minimum Wage

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If you are working in Florida, you may be seeing a pay-raise next year. The minimum wage will go up by 27 cents an hour on January 1, to $6.67 an hour. That's because of an initiative the state passed two years ago that requires the minimum wage keep pace with inflation.

LYNN NEARY, host:

On Fridays we focus on your money. If you're working in Florida, you may be seeing a pay raise next year. The minimum wage will go up by $0.27 an hour on January 1st, to $6.67 an hour.

That's because of an initiative the state passed two years ago that requires the minimum wage keep pace with inflation.

One thing deflating is the cost of a mortgage. Mortgage rates fell for the ninth time in ten weeks. For the week just ending, the average 30-year mortgage was at 6.31 percent.

And, you may want your ThinkPad to do the math, but you're going to need some new batteries. About a half-million rechargeable batteries in ThinkPad notebooks are being recalled by IBM and Lenovo, because they may cause a fire hazard.

This is the fourth such recall in recent months. Others involved Sony batteries in Dell, Toshiba, and Apple computers.

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