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Parties Court the Growing Exurban Vote in 2006

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Parties Court the Growing Exurban Vote in 2006

Parties Court the Growing Exurban Vote in 2006

Parties Court the Growing Exurban Vote in 2006

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6168147/6168148" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Robert Siegel travels to the eastern portion of Loudoun County, Va., to talk with a group of residents about the upcoming midterm elections.

Loudon, the eighth-fastest growing county in the United States, has struggled to grow its infrastructure along with its population: There are too few schools, too few roads and rising property taxes. Many of the residents are parents who typify an important group of the electorate that the political parties are vying to win over: emerging suburban voters.

The area, once viewed as rural and a given for the Republicans, is changing quickly.

Robert Siegel discusses the region with Democratic political analyst Ruy Teixeira and GOP political strategist David Winston.

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