Unknown Robert Frost Poem Unearthed

NPR's Scott Simon takes a moment to note the discovery of a previously unknown work by Robert Frost. The work was discovered by a graduate student at the University of Virginia.

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

News this week that a grad student rummaging through some uncataloged books and manuscripts at the University of Virginia has made a remarkable discovery, a poem by Robert Frost written in his own hand. Robert Stilling found the 35-line poem on the opening page of a small leather bound book. War Thoughts at Home was written in 1918, apparently inspired by the death in World War I of one of Mr. Frost's best friends, English poet Edward Thomas, who was killed in the trenches of France. Robert Stilling told the Washington Post that finding the poem is like coming across a ruin. The poem speaks of a woman in a snowbound house thinking about the soldiers in France.

It reads, in part, She thinks of a winter camp where soldiers for France are made. She draws down the window shade and it glows with an early lamp.

War Thoughts at Home will be published next week in the Virginia Quarterly Review almost 90 years after it was written.

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