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Are Humans Causing Elephants to Go Crazy?
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Are Humans Causing Elephants to Go Crazy?

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Are Humans Causing Elephants to Go Crazy?

Are Humans Causing Elephants to Go Crazy?
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Groups of young male elephants in Africa have gone wild, attacking whole villages and even packs of rhinos. Human beings might be indirectly responsible — new studies point to an alarming disintegration of the social fabric of the species, and the noise and physical threat posed by people might be prompting elephants to lose control, both in Africa and Asia.

New York Times Magazine contributor Charles Siebert talks to Alex Chadwick about his article about the elephant rampages, to be published in this weekend's edition.

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