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S. Koreans Divided on Response to Newest Threat

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S. Koreans Divided on Response to Newest Threat

World

S. Koreans Divided on Response to Newest Threat

S. Koreans Divided on Response to Newest Threat

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6229712/6229713" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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South Korean protesters shout anti-North Korea slogans during a rally on Tuesday in Seoul, South Korea. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

South Korean protesters shout anti-North Korea slogans during a rally on Tuesday in Seoul, South Korea.

Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Sentiment on the streets of Seoul is divided about how to respond to the latest threat to South Korean security. Some leading newspapers are calling for an end to South Korea's "sunshine" policy of openness to the North.

The two Koreas embarked on historic reconciliation efforts in 2000 after the first-and-only summit of their leaders. The underground test the North said it conducted Monday is the most serious challenge yet to Seoul's policy of engagement.

The South Korean government believes North Korea is trying to use the test as a bargaining chip with the U.S. to win economic concessions.