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U.N. Enlists 'Lonelygirl15' for Poverty Campaign

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U.N. Enlists 'Lonelygirl15' for Poverty Campaign

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U.N. Enlists 'Lonelygirl15' for Poverty Campaign

U.N. Enlists 'Lonelygirl15' for Poverty Campaign

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6229736/6229737" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Lonelygirl15 is not all that lonely, on the YouTube Web site. Her popular video blog is being used by the United Nations as part of an anti-poverty ad campaign. A teenager who calls herself "Bree," the actor who plays Lonelygirl usually talks about boys, and herself. The U.N.'s Millennium Campaign is banking on her popularity to get people involved in fighting poverty.

SUSAN STAMBERG, host:

Ms. JESSICA LEE ROSE (Actress): (As Lonelygirl15) Is not all that lonely on the YouTube Web site. Her popular video blog is being used by the United Nations as part of an anti-poverty ad campaign.

Ms. ROSE: (As Lonelygirl15) Believe it or not, I actually have something important to talk to you about today. And for once, it's not me.

STAMBERG: A teenager who calls herself Bree(ph), Lonelygirl usually talks about boys - yeah - and herself. The U.N.'s Millennium Campaign is banking on her popularity to get people involved in fighting poverty.

Ms. ROSE: (As Lonelygirl15) Fact: Half the world, nearly three billion people, live on less than $2 a day.

Fact: Twenty percent of the world's population consumes 86 percent of its resources. Fact: Every three seconds, somewhere in the world, a child dies from poverty. That's about…

STAMBERG: Lonelygirl15 is performed by teenage actress Jessica Lee Rose.

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