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U.N. Appeals to Sudan's Trading Partners over Darfur

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U.N. Appeals to Sudan's Trading Partners over Darfur

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U.N. Appeals to Sudan's Trading Partners over Darfur

U.N. Appeals to Sudan's Trading Partners over Darfur

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The U.N.'s top humanitarian official is calling on Sudan's trading partners in Asia and the Arab world to pressure the African government to accept an international peacekeeping force in Darfur. Over the past three years, some 200,000 people have been killed in the Darfur region of western Sudan.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Well, here are some numbers that are easy to lose track of. Over the past three years, some 200,000 people have been killed in the Darfur region of western Sudan. More than two million people have been displaced.

Now the U.N.'s top humanitarian official is calling on Sudan's trading partners in Asia and the Arab world to pressure Sudan's government to accept an international peacekeeping force.

Jan Egeland explained the situation in Darfur as a nightmare. So far the Sudanese government has opposed plans to send in U.N. peacekeepers to replace an African union force that's now there.

INSKEEP: You're listening to MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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