YouTube Founders Have the Last Laugh

Everyone seems to have something to say about Google buying YouTube. In fact, the video-sharing site's founders posted their own video about the purchase after it was announced.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word on business belongs to some YouTube users. To understand it, though, you first need to hear the next to last word.

YouTube's founders posted a video of their own, on the site this week. While announcing the sale to Google they threw in a bunch of corporate-speak about improving service, and even they could not keep a straight face.

Mr. CHAD HURLEY (YouTube Founder): Two kings have gotten together and we're going to be able to provide you an even better service, and build even more innovative features for you.

(Soundbite of laughter)

INSKEEP: The last word, though, goes to their customers, who have since posted spoof videos of their own.

Unidentified Man #2: What? What? What? Kid, don't touch me! Don't touch me!

(Soundbite of laughter)

INSKEEP: Other users chimed in with suggestion for what YouTube should now be called, like maybe GooTube, or GlueTube, or Yoogle.

And from NPR News, this is MORNING EDITION.

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