NPR logo

DMZ Tourists at Observation Post Dora

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6266651/6266652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
DMZ Tourists at Observation Post Dora

Around the Nation

DMZ Tourists at Observation Post Dora

DMZ Tourists at Observation Post Dora

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6266651/6266652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A worker washes a window on the North Korean side of the demilitarized zone separating North and South Korea, as a guard stands by and a North Korean officer peers through the glass with binoculars (see enlargement). Michael Sullivan, NPR hide caption

toggle caption Michael Sullivan, NPR

A worker washes a window on the North Korean side of the demilitarized zone separating North and South Korea, as a guard stands by and a North Korean officer peers through the glass with binoculars (see enlargement).

Michael Sullivan, NPR

The most heavily fortified strip of land in the world is the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea. In the DMZ, the potential for war has remained tangible for over 50 years. Yet it's also a popular tourist destination.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.