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Guatemala, Venezuela Compete for U.N. Seat

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Guatemala, Venezuela Compete for U.N. Seat

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Guatemala, Venezuela Compete for U.N. Seat

Guatemala, Venezuela Compete for U.N. Seat

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The United States is supporting Guatemala for a seat on the U.N. Security Council. Venezuela's president, Hugo Chavez, said Washington was waging "a dirty war" to keep his country from getting the seat.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Another vote, which is scheduled today, could bring more power to the Latin American leader who recently spoke these words at the United Nations.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Yesterday, ladies and gentleman, from this rostrum, the president of the United States - the gentleman to whom I refer to as the devil - came here.

INSKEEP: That's an interpreter, rendering the words of Hugo Chavez, the president of Venezuela. This vocal opponent of the United States is seeking a seat for his country on the United Nations Security Council. The council has the most power at the U.N. There's a temporary opening and all 192 nations that are part of the U.N. hold a vote to see who gets it. The contest is between Venezuela and Guatemala. The winner is decided today, by the U.N. general assembly.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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