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Pressure Mounts on Iraqis to Quell Violence

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Pressure Mounts on Iraqis to Quell Violence

Iraq

Pressure Mounts on Iraqis to Quell Violence

Pressure Mounts on Iraqis to Quell Violence

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6353561/6353562" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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An Iraqi police commando scans a street in the southern city of Amara on October 20. Essam al-Sudani/AFP hide caption

toggle caption Essam al-Sudani/AFP

Earlier this week, White House spokesman Tony Snow said President Bush has reassured Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki there was no deadline for him to rein in the sectarian violence threatening to tear the nation apart.

So why was the Iraqi leader worried about what Snow called a "rumor"?

Alex Chadwick talks with three experts about the future of the troubled nation, and whether an ultimatum to the Iraqi government will lead to a decrease in tensions that threaten to tear the nation apart:

Mahmoud Othman
Marco Di Lauro

Mahmoud Othman

Kurdish member of Iraq's Parliament, Sunni Muslim and key proponent of Kurdish independence.

'He talks so much, Mr. Bush -- we don't know what's wrong and what's right.'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6353561/6356925" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Leslie Gelb
Manny Ceneta

Leslie Gelb

President emeritus of the Council on Foreign Relations, former New York Times correspondent and columnist.

'I don't believe in deadlines -- I believe in convincing your allies and enemies you're serious.'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6353561/6356951" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI)
Karen Bleier

Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI)

Member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, West Point graduate and former Army Ranger.

'It's imperitive that the Iraqi government control the security situation as soon as possible.'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6353561/6356937" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

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