Iraq

Pressure Mounts on Iraqis to Quell Violence

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An Iraqi police commando scans a street in the southern city of Amara, Oct. 20, 2006.

An Iraqi police commando scans a street in the southern city of Amara on October 20. Essam al-Sudani/AFP hide caption

toggle caption Essam al-Sudani/AFP

Earlier this week, White House spokesman Tony Snow said President Bush has reassured Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki there was no deadline for him to rein in the sectarian violence threatening to tear the nation apart.

So why was the Iraqi leader worried about what Snow called a "rumor"?

Alex Chadwick talks with three experts about the future of the troubled nation, and whether an ultimatum to the Iraqi government will lead to a decrease in tensions that threaten to tear the nation apart:

Mahmoud Othman
Marco Di Lauro

Mahmoud Othman

Kurdish member of Iraq's Parliament, Sunni Muslim and key proponent of Kurdish independence.

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Leslie Gelb
Manny Ceneta

Leslie Gelb

President emeritus of the Council on Foreign Relations, former New York Times correspondent and columnist.

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Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI)
Karen Bleier

Sen. Jack Reed (D-RI)

Member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, West Point graduate and former Army Ranger.

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