Sliding Through the Art at London's Tate Modern

Spectators can watch people sliding down Holler's tubes from the safety of the gallery. i i

hide captionSpectators can watch people sliding down Holler's tubes from the safety of the gallery.

Tate Photography
Spectators can watch people sliding down Holler's tubes from the safety of the gallery.

Spectators can watch people sliding down Holler's tubes from the safety of the gallery.

Tate Photography
Is It Art -- or Just Fun? The slides glide down to the Tate Modern's floor. i i

hide captionIs It Art — or Just Fun? The slides glide down to the Tate Modern's floor.

Tate Photography
Is It Art -- or Just Fun? The slides glide down to the Tate Modern's floor.

Is It Art — or Just Fun? The slides glide down to the Tate Modern's floor.

Tate Photography

A new sculpture exhibition at London's Tate Modern gallery gives visitors a chance to experience art from the inside out.

German artist Carsten Holler has built a series of long, curving slides inside the gallery's cavernous Turbine Hall — named for its previous role as a power station.

The slides, whose clear plastic and shiny, burnished metal make them look like an austere, stylish water park, allow gallery-goers to twist and twirl through structures as pieces of art.

Those who are unnerved by the thought of tumbling several stories down thin metal slides to the gallery's floor will find little reassurance in the installation's title: Test Site.

Video: Tate Modern Site

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