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Congratulations, Here's Your Mountain!

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Congratulations, Here's Your Mountain!

Congratulations, Here's Your Mountain!

Congratulations, Here's Your Mountain!

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6355678/6355683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Antarctica's Mount Payne rises to more than 3,200 feet. It is named for Roger Payne, retired executive secretary to the U.S. Board on Geographic Names. USGS hide caption

toggle caption USGS

Antarctica's Mount Payne rises to more than 3,200 feet. It is named for Roger Payne, retired executive secretary to the U.S. Board on Geographic Names.

USGS

When you work for the federal government, they may not pay you a lot. But as a federal employee, you do get some rather unusual benefits.

Roger Payne retired this year from his post as executive secretary of the U.S. Board on Geographic Names.

As a thank you for his 33 years of service in the Interior Department, he had a mountain named after him.

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