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A Theory About Christie's Most Personal Mystery

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A Theory About Christie's Most Personal Mystery

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A Theory About Christie's Most Personal Mystery

A Theory About Christie's Most Personal Mystery

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Dr. Andrew Norman's new biography of whodunnit writer Agatha Christie offers a theory that may explain a mystery in Christie's own life. In 1926 she disappeared for 11 days before she was discovered at a hotel in Harrogate, England. Norman tells Andrea Seabrook Christie had experienced a "fugue state."

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