Toothbrush Plays Pop Tunes

You might turn on your radio or CD player while getting ready in the bathroom. But how about your toothbrush? A toy company has created one that actually plays pop songs.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And the last word on business this morning is going directly to your brain. Every once in a while you read about somebody who's hearing voices in his or her head. Well, the toy company Hasbro has created a toothbrush - a musical toothbrush - which will actually put voices in your head. It's called Tooth Tunes, and we have one right here. It looks like a regular, electric toothbrush. You are supposed to turn it on and press it against your teeth.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: Oh, my God. I can hear this. I can hear this. Can you hear this? Ben, this is unbelievable. Wow. So the whole time I'm brushing my teeth, and if I stop - this is insane. Let's amplify that by putting a cup up against it.

(Soundbite of song, "Let's Get It Started")

BLACK EYED PEAS (Band): (Singing) Let's get it started, let's get it started.

INSKEEP: The song, by the way, is Let's Get It Started by the Black Eyed Peas. If you don't like that, you can also get brushes with music by Hillary Duff, The Cheetah Girls and others. And for those of us a little longer in the tooth, you get music by Kiss or the Beach Boys.

This really is MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

(Soundbite of song, Let's Get It Started)

BLACK EYED PEAS: (Singing) ...yeah, yeah.

INSKEEP: I'm Steve Inskeep.

(Soundbite of song, Let's Get It Started)

BLACK EYED PEAS: (Singing) Let's get it started. Let's get it started in here. Let's get it started - hey. Let's get it started in here. Let's get it started - hey. Let's get it started in here. Let's get it sta, sta, sta, sta - lose control of body and soul. Don't move too fast, people, just take it slow. Don't get ahead, just jump into it.

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