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Polls Show Tight Races for Nov. 7

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Polls Show Tight Races for Nov. 7

Polls Show Tight Races for Nov. 7

Polls Show Tight Races for Nov. 7

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6376552/6376553" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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With 14 days remaining before the midterm election, Melissa Block highlights poll numbers from some of the tightest races.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

With two weeks left to election day, it's no surprise that Karl Rove and his Democratic counterparts are poring over the polls. Earlier, we heard about the latest in the race for control of the House. The Senate is also considered to be in play, something that defied conventional wisdom only a few weeks ago.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Democrats need to hold all of their seats and take six Republican seats to become the majority party in the Senate. Right now only one Democratic seat, according to the latest polls, appears to be in jeopardy. That's New Jersey. Democrat Robert Menendez holds a slim lead over Republican challenger Thomas Kean, Jr. Democrats are ahead of Republican incumbents in four states -Montana, Ohio, Rhode Island and Pennsylvania.

BLOCK: Races for three seats currently held by the GOP are still neck and neck.

SIEGEL: In Missouri, first term Senator Jim Talent is facing a tough battle with Democrat Claire McCaskill.

BLOCK: In Virginia, the Democrat Jim Webb is running a tight race against Senator George Allen. Allen's campaign has been beleaguered from the moment the senator used the word macaca to describe an Indian American who was videotaping one of his rallies. As Karl Rove mentioned, a new poll shows Allen slightly ahead, though within the margin of error.

SIEGEL: And in Tennessee, Democrat Harold Ford, Jr., is hoping to become the first African American to win statewide there since reconstruction. He's facing the former mayor of Chattanooga, Bob Corker, and in the eyes of many observers, Ford has been running an unexpectedly strong campaign.

BLOCK: Finally, a note about a contest we were following closely for a while, that's the Connecticut Senate race, where Joseph Lieberman lost the Democratic primary and is now running as an independent. Polls show he's about 12 points ahead of Ned Lamont, who beat him in that Democratic primary. The Republican in this race, Allen Schlesinger, is favored by a little more than 5 percent of those polled.

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