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'The Bridge': Cameras as Witness to Tragedy

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'The Bridge': Cameras as Witness to Tragedy

Movies

'The Bridge': Cameras as Witness to Tragedy

'The Bridge': Cameras as Witness to Tragedy

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6392776/6392777" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A suicidal person filmed on The Bridge prepares to jump. She was eventually pursuaded not to kill herself. First Stripe Production hide caption

toggle caption First Stripe Production

Since it was first erected during the Great Depression, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco has been a magnet for despondent people looking to take their own lives by jumping from the span.

In 2004 alone, there were at least 24 suicide attempts — documentary director Eric Steel filmed the bridge every day that year, and recorded 23 of those leaps.

His new film, The Bridge, weaves together hours of interviews with family and friends of those who died.

Alex Chadwick talks to Steel about his controversial film.

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