President Bush and 'the Google'

President Bush is still catching grief on Internet blogs for his response to a question from CNBC on whether he'd ever Googled anybody. The president called the search company "the Google." Bloggers have been reminding anyone who will listen about the president's reference during a 2004 debate to "the Internets."

Copyright © 2006 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And today's last word in business is the, as in the Google. President Bush is still catching grief on Internet blogs over his response to a question from CNBC, on whether he'd ever Googled anybody.

President GEORGE W. BUSH: Occasionally. And one of the things that I use on the Google is to pull up maps, and it's very interesting to see that I forgot to...

MONTAGNE: Turns out that when a president uses a definite article in front of Google, it's certain to elicit howls from techies. On the other hand, President Bush has won some cool points for having tooled around on a Segway scooter and for his use of an iPod.

Still, bloggers have been reminding anyone within sight of a keyboard about the president's reference during a 2004 debate to the Internets. One problem with the Google - not to mention the YouTube, the Yahoo, or any sort of gaff, minor or major - is that it's going to get attention if it's made by the George W. Bush.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

JOHN YDSTIE, host:

And I'm John Ydstie.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: