Sports

World Cup 'Injuries' Faked

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Last summer's soccer World Cup left a lot of players writhing on the ground in pain. And most of the injuries were faked. The sport's governing body is out with a review, finding "58 percent of the players treated on the pitch turned out not to be injured." Tell that to the Australians. Australia lost when a blatant dive by an Italian player resulted in a penalty kick that gave the Italians the game.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Last summer's soccer World Cup left a lot of players writhing on the ground in pain, and most of the injuries were faked. The sport's governing body is out with the review finding 58 percent of the players treated on the pitch turned out not to be injured. Tell that to the Australians. Australia lost when a blatant dive by an Italian player resulted in a penalty kick that gave the Italians the game and ultimately the championship. It's MORNING EDITION.

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