Elephants Have a Concept of Self, Study Suggests

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Bronx Zoo elephant Happy looks at her reflection in the mirror. i

Happy, an elephant at the Bronx Zoo, looks at her reflection in the mirror. Diana Reiss, Wildlife Conservation Society hide caption

itoggle caption Diana Reiss, Wildlife Conservation Society
Bronx Zoo elephant Happy looks at her reflection in the mirror.

Happy, an elephant at the Bronx Zoo, looks at her reflection in the mirror.

Diana Reiss, Wildlife Conservation Society

A study titled "Self-Recognition in an Asian Elephant" has found that elephants, like humans, chimpanzees, and dolphins, recognize themselves in mirrors. Robert Siegel talks with Joshua Plotnik, a gradate student in psychology at Emory University's Yerkes National Primate Research Center, who co-authored the study.

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