Museum Recalls Hero of 'The Rape of Nanjing'

Thomas Rabe places flowers next to the statute of his grandfather, John Rabe. i i

hide captionThomas Rabe places flowers next to the statute of his grandfather, John Rabe, at the opening of the John Rabe and International Safety Zone Memorial Hall in Nanjing, China.

Louisa Lim, NPR
Thomas Rabe places flowers next to the statute of his grandfather, John Rabe.

Thomas Rabe places flowers next to the statute of his grandfather, John Rabe, at the opening of the John Rabe and International Safety Zone Memorial Hall in Nanjing, China.

Louisa Lim, NPR
Jiang Genfu

hide captionJiang Genfu was just nine years old when the Japanese invaded. He witnessed his mother and baby brother being killed by Japanese soldiers.

Louisa Lim, NPR

A new museum has just opened in Nanjing, China, commemorating the actions of a German businessman who saved lives during the 1937 Japanese invasion of the city. Known as the "Rape of Nanjing," the Japanese are believed to have killed 300,000 Chinese during the invasion and occupation.

The house where John Rabe sheltered 600 Chinese civilians has been turned into a museum and international research center for peace and reconciliation.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: