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A Family's Political Tradition, from Cuba to the U.S.
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A Family's Political Tradition, from Cuba to the U.S.

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A Family's Political Tradition, from Cuba to the U.S.

A Family's Political Tradition, from Cuba to the U.S.
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  • Transcript

This election season, commentator Ana Hebra Flaster has been volunteering for a gubernatorial candidate in Massachusetts, where she lives.

Participating in the political process isn't something Flaster is always comfortable with — her first exposure to politics came when she was a little girl, growing up in Castro's Cuba.

Now, Flaster sees three generations of political activism in her family: her father's reluctant participation in anti-capitalist rallies; her own tentative forays into demonstrations in Massachusetts; and her daughter's growing interest in a gubernatorial candidate this year.

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