NPR logo

Transit of Mercury Will Be Last for 10 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6449417/6449420" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Transit of Mercury Will Be Last for 10 Years

Space

Transit of Mercury Will Be Last for 10 Years

Transit of Mercury Will Be Last for 10 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6449417/6449420" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Watch a Live Webcast

Read About It

Gazing at the galaxy is usually a nighttime activity. But Wednesday, one planet will quite literally have its moment in the sun. The planet Mercury will slowly slide across the face of the sun for about five hours on Wednesday in a rare transit that won't happen again until 2016.

The transit means that for those who are prepared, Mercury can be seen in broad daylight, appearing like a tiny spot moving across the sun.

Michele Norris talks with Kelly Beatty, editor for Night Sky Magazine and executive editor of Sky and Telescope magazine, about how to safely see Mercury crossing the sun. Beatty says the transit will take about five hours, beginning around 2:15 p.m. ET.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.