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Electing a Congress, Watching for Change

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Electing a Congress, Watching for Change

Analysis

Electing a Congress, Watching for Change

Electing a Congress, Watching for Change

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6449802/6449803" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

America goes to the polls, electing all the members of the next House of Representatives, one-third of the new Senate and 36 of the nation's governors. Midterm elections in a president's second term are sometimes dramatic, and this one could bring change to the national political landscape, as well.

Races in Kentucky, Indiana, Missouri and Virginia have been identified as keys to determining which party controls Congress — and by how much.

Since many of those races are on the East Coast, many observers suggest that the shape of the new government will be evident before the early hours of Wednesday.

Polls in Indiana, for instance, will be closed by 7 p.m., ET.

Michele Norris talks with NPR Mara Liasson.

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