For Bush and Pelosi, Advice from a Pro Advice columnist Amy Dickinson, of "Ask Amy" fame, offers relationship advice to President Bush and California Democrat Rep. Nancy Pelosi. Pelosi is expected to become speaker of the House in the new Congress.
NPR logo

For Bush and Pelosi, Advice from a Pro

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6463378/6463379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
For Bush and Pelosi, Advice from a Pro

For Bush and Pelosi, Advice from a Pro

For Bush and Pelosi, Advice from a Pro

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6463378/6463379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Advice columnist Amy Dickinson, of "Ask Amy" fame, offers relationship advice to President Bush and California Democrat Rep. Nancy Pelosi. Pelosi is expected to become speaker of the House in the new Congress.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

We don't know if Nancy Pelosi promised unstinted usefulness when she sat down with President Bush today. In fact, we're pretty sure she didn't. The soon to be speaker of the House and the president have had their differences, and they promised to seek common ground.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

But if the two need to patch up a rough spot in their relationship, sounds like a job for the advice column Ask Amy.

Unidentified Pelosi Impersonator: Dear Amy: We're in a long-term relationship, and we have kids, lots and lots of kids.

Unidentified Bush Impersonator: We haven't gotten along for a long time.

Unidentified Pelosi Impersonator: There's been lots of squabbling, back-stabbing and even some public name-calling.

Unidentified Bush Impersonator: We both wish we could take back some of the things we've said to each other.

Unidentified Pelosi Impersonator: We have called each other liars on a number of occasions.

Unidentified Bush Impersonator: We've referred to one another using some very unflattering language to our associates.

Unidentified Pelosi Impersonator: Some of these comments were meant to be funny, but you know how some of these things can get out of hand.

Unidentified Bush Impersonator: We are both very sensitive, especially about certain sayings, such are our household budget, overseas trips.

Unidentified Pelosi Impersonator: We really don't know how to fight fair.

Unidentified Bush Impersonator: One of us will get loud, and the other will just leave the room.

Unidentified Pelosi Impersonator: Now we'd like to try to work things out.

Unidentified Bush Impersonator: A lot of people are depending on us.

Unidentified Pelosi Impersonator: We want to be uniters, not dividers.

Unidentified Bush Impersonator: Is it too late to repair our relationship?

Unidentified Pelosi Impersonator: We don't even know where to start.

Unidentified Bush Impersonator: Help us.

Unidentified Pelosi Impersonator: Nancy.

Unidentified Bush Impersonator: And George.

AMY DICKINSON: Dear George and Nancy, It sounds like your relationship has taken a real thumpin'. The first thing you need to determine is whether both of you really want to repair it. It takes two to fight, but it also takes two to make up. Unfortunately, you two can't turn back the clock and take back all of the things you've said.

All you can do now is acknowledge how tough things have been. Join hands and move forward as a couple. You can say to each other honey, we've said and done some things that we regret. We've called each other tax and spenders. We've used hurtful language and some unflattering hand gestures. We've criticized one another's friends and work associates. We know that words can hurt, and we apologize. Look into each other's eyes. Remind yourselves of the good times you've had.

Agree to wipe the slate clean and renew your commitment to one another. If you can't do this for each other right now, please try to reconcile for the kids' sake. It hurts them when you fight in front of them, and they need for you to get along. Sometimes couples who have been through very tough times come out with a stronger, more loving commitment, but it's not going to be easy. It's going to take more than the occasional lunch, flirty e-mail exchange or a bunch of flowers. You're going to have to do some very heavy lifting here. So, can you do it?

I think you can.

BLOCK: Amy Dickinson writes the syndicated advice column Ask Amy.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.