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A Dire Prediction for the Future of Sea Life

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A Dire Prediction for the Future of Sea Life

Environment

A Dire Prediction for the Future of Sea Life

A Dire Prediction for the Future of Sea Life

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A new study says we could see the end of seafood within 50 years, if overfishing and ocean pollution continues unabated. Critics of the study say it made some assumptions that won't hold up in the real world.

Boris Worm, professor, Marine Conservation Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Steve Murawski, director of scientific programs and chief science adviser, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Patrick Sullivan , associate professor, Department of Natural Resources at Cornell University

Lee Crockett, executive director, Marine Fish Conservation Network