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Basketball Diplomacy from John Bolton

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Basketball Diplomacy from John Bolton

Politics

Basketball Diplomacy from John Bolton

Basketball Diplomacy from John Bolton

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John Bolton, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, took members of the U.N. Security Council to a Knicks game this week in New York.

LYNN NEARY, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

(Soundbite of music)

NEARY: There were some special guests at Madison Square Garden this week to watch the New York Knicks lose to the San Antonio Spurs. America's U.N. Ambassador John Bolton brought the Security Council with him to take in the game. China's Ambassador Wang Guangya would rather have seen Chinese star Yao Ming on the court, but he plays for the Houston Rockets.

Still, Ambassador Guangya was glad to have time off from trying to resolve the world's conflicts. It's fun, he said. For two or three hours we think of nothing but sports. John Bolton, whose days at the U.N. may be numbered after this week's election, rooted for the Knicks rather than the team from Texas, saying this is a little dangerous for a Bush administration official.

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