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Letters: Politics Meets Tech, Dave Barry's Many Gifts

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Letters: Politics Meets Tech, Dave Barry's Many Gifts

From Our Listeners

Letters: Politics Meets Tech, Dave Barry's Many Gifts

Letters: Politics Meets Tech, Dave Barry's Many Gifts

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6486529/6486530" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Listeners comment on technology's effect on American politics, and Dave Barry's new book and holiday traditions.

LYNN NEARY, host:

It's Tuesday and time to read from your e-mails. First, a couple of corrections. On Wednesday last week, President Bush announced that he had accepted Donald Rumsfeld's resignation as secretary of defense. During our coverage, it was mentioned that Secretary Rumsfeld had previously served as the head of Bechtel, the giant engineering and construction firm. That is not the case. According to Bechtel, Donald Rumsfeld is not a past president of the company.

And a week ago Monday, we talked about technology's effect on American politics. One example mentioned was Al Gore's documentary film, "An Inconvenient Truth." We said the movie started out as a PowerPoint presentation. Randy Robb(ph) e-mailed to tell us we were mistaken.

You had an error in your information that drove me, as an avid Mac user, just about crazy, he wrote. Mr. Gore did not use Microsoft's PowerPoint for his presentation, he used the Apple Keynote software. I felt I had to sound off to give proper credit to the folks at Apple.

On Tuesday last week, Dave Barry joined us for a little preholiday cheer. He told us about Barry Christmas traditions and talked about The Shepherd, The Angel and Walter the Christmas Miracle Dog. And, of course, he gave us a sneak peek at this year's list of ridiculous gift ideas.

Betty Bishop(ph), a listener in Chester, California, e-mailed with a story of her own. My aunt and uncle had to take a gag gift to a party, she wrote, so they wrapped up some old cabbage leaves and a very old, dried-up cow patty. They had it in the back of the car on the way to the party, all wrapped up. They stopped for a quick errand, did not lock the car, and guess what? Someone stole the package. We'd love to know how the thief reacted.

If you missed our visit with Dave Barry, just drop by our home page at npr.org. We've posted a Q&A and an excerpt from his book. And while you're there, remember that our Opinion Page segment, which airs every Monday, is now available to go as a podcast. You can download yesterday's conversation and all the recent Opinion Pages at the TALK OF THE NATION page at npr.org.

As always, if you have comments, questions or corrections for us, the best way to reach us is by e-mail. Our address is talk@npr.org. Please take a minute to let us know where you're writing from, and give us some help on how to pronounce your name.

(Soundbite of music)

NEARY: This is TALK OF THE NATION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

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