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Bassoonist Lets Music Be Top Priority

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Bassoonist Lets Music Be Top Priority

Bassoonist Lets Music Be Top Priority

Bassoonist Lets Music Be Top Priority

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6486547/6486548" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Kian Andersen, 16, says she practices her bassoon three to four hours a day. From the Top hide caption

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From the Top

Kian Andersen of Harvest, Ala., discovered her passion for music while indulging in another interest: competitive swimming.

"While swimming, I would listen to fast-paced rock songs, and the driving melodies would give me the burst of energy I needed," she recalls. "That's when I first discovered the power of music, and my desire to play it, and this led me to the bassoon. I fell in love with its rich and hearty tone."

The 16-year-old spends a great deal of time playing her bassoon.

"I practice for three to four hours a day, and I'm a member of the Huntsville Youth Orchestra as well as a woodwind chamber group," she says.

She has had to give up some of her other activities to prioritize bassoon, but she says she wouldn't change a thing.

She performs Georg Philipp Telemann's Sonata in F Minor, Allegro.