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Bank of America Video: 'One' Bad Idea Goes Viral

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Bank of America Video: 'One' Bad Idea Goes Viral

Bank of America Video: 'One' Bad Idea Goes Viral

Bank of America Video: 'One' Bad Idea Goes Viral

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Bank of America video

When two Bank of America employees reworked the U2 song "One" for a company conference, they could never have known that the video would end up on youtube.com. The song is so painfully bad that it has become an Internet phenomenon. But Universal Music, who owns the rights to the original U2 song, is not amused.

Videos that Put YouTube.com on the Map

Videos that Put YouTube.com on the Map

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YouTube.com began as a classic Silicon Valley start-up in a garage -- Google.com recently bought the site for $1.65 billion. Jerry Arcieri/Corbis hide caption

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Jerry Arcieri/Corbis

The rise of YouTube.com from upstart Web site to the Internet's top destination for video happened so fast that it seemed to all but the most obsessive Web surfers to spring up from nowhere.

Launched in August 2005, YouTube.com wasn't the first Web site with video archives. But what set YouTube.com apart was the site's ability to make it easy for technophobes to upload videos to the site and find and view what others uploaded.

The site's slogan may be "Broadcast Yourself," but a big part of the appeal may be the many clips taken from popular television shows or films that find their way into the archives. Visitors to the site view more than 100 million videos every day.

Slate contributor Paul Boutin reviews some of the YouTube.com videos that became wildly popular and helped spark more interest in the site: