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When Traffic Lights Make Us Stop and Think
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When Traffic Lights Make Us Stop and Think

When Traffic Lights Make Us Stop and Think

When Traffic Lights Make Us Stop and Think
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A manhole cover in Chapel Hill, N.C., with blue arrows painted on its corners.

Like traffic lights, manhole covers (including this one in Chapel Hill, N.C.) have their own secrets. To learn what the arrows have to tell us, explore the photo gallery. Brian Hayes hide caption

toggle caption Brian Hayes

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For the past 15 years, writer Brian Hayes has made a hobby out of studying — and photographing — the manmade. He is the author of Infrastructure: A Field Guide to the Industrial Landscape.

Inspired by his daughter's questions, he set out to learn more about the workings of power lines, fire hydrants and other mysteries of the industrial age.

His subject on a recent field trip to the traffic command center in the nation's capital: How do stoplights work?

Books Featured In This Story

Infrastructure

A Field Guide To The Industrial Landscape

by Brian Hayes

Hardcover, 536 pages |

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Infrastructure
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A Field Guide To The Industrial Landscape
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