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Carrie Fisher's Thanksgiving Tips: Name that Relative
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Carrie Fisher's Thanksgiving Tips: Name that Relative

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Carrie Fisher's Thanksgiving Tips: Name that Relative

Carrie Fisher's Thanksgiving Tips: Name that Relative
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On this Thanksgiving, Alex Chadwick gets some tips from writer and actress Carrie Fisher on how to negotiate often tricky family gatherings. The first tip: What to do if you're sitting next to a relative whose name you can't remember.

ALEX CHADWICK, host:

There's a family that's not going to get together today, but many, many others will for gatherings that are sometimes more complex than we expect.

For complexity in families and a little expert guidance, DAY TO DAY has turned to actress and writer Carrie Fisher. Her family story is the stuff of Hollywood legend. Famous divorced parents, multiple stepparents - details to come.

But for the moment, we sit with Carrie Fisher at her home - in her backyard, a fountain burbling behind us - and ask for some advice, ask her to be our guide to family gatherings.

You're at a family event, people are sitting at the table, and you sit down beside someone who is a stepsibling and you cannot remember the stepsibling's name.

Ms. CARRIE FISHER (Actress/Writer): Oh, my god. Well, you can imagine how that would happen in my family.

CHADWICK: That family - Debbie Reynolds, her mom, her dad, Eddie Fisher, maybe a half-dozen stepparents, including Elizabeth Taylor. So you can imagine? Do you confess I can't remember your name or even why I'm related to you? No.

Ms. FISHER: Never. I never do. I just vamp until - and I think there must be some crazed look in my eye that would indicate it and then - but I will slowly move off and ask my brother or my mother - but my mother is hopeless. And she'll be asking someone else. But I will never admit it.

CHADWICK: All right. That's a Thanksgiving tip from Carrie Fischer. You don't recognize whoever it is your sitting next to. Don't worry. Make happy conversation and then later on, get the ID on this person from someone else.

Carrie, thank you.

Ms. FISHER: I'm glad I could help.

CHADWICK: Actress and writer Carrie Fischer, she has more Thanksgiving family gathering tips and her personal story, as told in a new one-woman show, coming up later on the program.

(Soundbite of music)

And NPR's DAY TO DAY continues.

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