Contest: Create a Menorah, a Kinara, an Ornament

Red State / Blue State Christmas Ornament i i

hide captionThe jagged edges on our red state / blue state ornament represent the pain each side has caused the other. And yet, in our holiday ornament, they have come together as one.

Avie Schneider, NPR
Red State / Blue State Christmas Ornament

The jagged edges on our red state / blue state ornament represent the pain each side has caused the other. And yet, in our holiday ornament, they have come together as one.

Avie Schneider, NPR

Contest Winners

Suri Cruise's head on an ornament

hide captionWhat little angel deserves top placement on your Christmas tree this year? Suri Cruise, of course!

Avie Schneider, NPR
Mel Gibson Menorah i i

hide captionEight Mel Gibson movies and a Mel Gibson holding a candle-shaped award as the shamash. As our grandmother would say: "Oy."

Avie Schneider, NPR
Mel Gibson Menorah

Eight Mel Gibson movies and a Mel Gibson holding a candle-shaped award as the shamash. As our grandmother would say: "Oy."

Avie Schneider, NPR

'Tis the season to make crafts.

Fa la la la la la la la la.

Enter our contest and make us laugh.

Fa la la la la la la la la la.

If you've been following all the news,

Fa la la la la la la la la,

Make a timely ornament or Kwanzaa kinara (or a menorah, for the Jews!).

What: NPR's First Ever Holiday Craft Contest. Design either a handmade menorah or kinara (the candle holder for the Kwanzaa holiday) or a Christmas tree ornament. We are looking for designs that reflect the news of 2006. We also welcome quirky, funny and/or offbeat designs. (See examples to the left.)

Prizes: Swag from the NPR Shop: The Hanukkah Lights Gift Set for the menorah winner; an NPR Jazz Christmas Collection with Marian McPartland for the ornament winner; the I Heard it on NPR set of world music, jazz and blues CDs for the kinara winner.

Deadline: Dec. 11, 2006, no later than 11:59 p.m.

Judging: NPR's digital media staff will do the honors, along with guest judges Phillip Torrone, senior editor of Make Magazine , Carla Sinclair, editor-in-chief of Craft Magazine and Jack Moline, rabbi of Agudas Achim Congregation in Alexandria, Va., and author of Growing Up Jewish, a book of humor. Winners will be announced at npr.org by Dec. 15, 2006. Runners-up will be displayed in an online photo gallery.

Questions? Comments? You can contact us at holidaycontest@npr.org and we will do our best to respond quickly.

Sample Entry: Mel Gibson Mel-norah. This menorah works on two levels: It symbolizes a willingness to accept Gibson's apology for his anti-Semitic rant but also, for skeptics, offers the chance to watch hot wax drip down his punim (the Yiddish word for face). Materials: Mel Gibson cutouts and menorah. Don't forget to include your e-mail address!

Practical Rules for the Contest: The ornament must be hangable. The menorah must hold eight candles plus a raised ninth candle, aka the shamash in Hebrew, which lights the others. The menorah must also safely support nine lit candles.

Very Serious Rules for the Contest: Only complete entries, including a short artist's statement about the ornament or menorah's theme, will be eligible for the contest. NPR is not responsible for improperly posted or incomplete entries. Void where prohibited or restricted by law. To participate, you must be at least 18 years of age or obtain the consent of a parent or guardian. All entries must include the artist's name and e-mail address. NPR employees and their immediate family members are not eligible to enter.

Rules of Consent: Each contest participant consents to the use of his or her name, a photo of his or her creation and an artist's statement on the NPR web site, over air ,and in all media and manner, now or hereafter known, throughout the world, in perpetuity, without compensation.

Image Content Disclaimer: The images uploaded to flickr.com as part of this contest are the sole responsibility of the artists. Views reflected in these images are not those of NPR, nor can NPR ensure appropriateness or legality of this artwork.

Comments

 

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