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U.S. Tries Taking Luxuries Away from Kim Jong ll

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U.S. Tries Taking Luxuries Away from Kim Jong ll

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U.S. Tries Taking Luxuries Away from Kim Jong ll

U.S. Tries Taking Luxuries Away from Kim Jong ll

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North Korea's nuclear test led to more sanctions, and a novel approach by the Bush administration: depriving Kim Jong Il of the luxuries he likes most. No more iPods, plasma TVs, Rolexes, Cognac or Harleys. It's the first time the U.S. has used trade penalties to annoy a leader. One former state department official is skeptical, pointing out that if the North Korean leader can secretly move nukes, he can sneak in a case of scotch.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

North Korea's nuclear test led to more sanctions and a novel approach by the Bush administration, depriving Kim Jong Il of his favorite luxuries - no more iPods, plasma TVs, Rolexes, Cognac or Harleys. It's the first time the U.S. has used trade penalties to annoy a leader. One former state department official is skeptical, pointing out that if the North Korean leader can secretly move nukes, he can sneak in a case of Scotch.

This is MORNING EDITION.

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