Source of Prize-Winning Execution Photo Revealed

  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/6567103/6567337" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Transcript
A government firing squad executes nine Kurdish rebels and two former police officers i

A government firing squad executes nine Kurdish rebels and two former police officers of the deposed Shah of Iran after summary trials, Aug. 27, 1979. The next day, another 21 Kurdish rebels and military deserters were executed. Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Corbis
A government firing squad executes nine Kurdish rebels and two former police officers

A government firing squad executes nine Kurdish rebels and two former police officers of the deposed Shah of Iran after summary trials, Aug. 27, 1979. The next day, another 21 Kurdish rebels and military deserters were executed.

Corbis

In 1979, the U.S.-backed Shah of Iran was overthrown by Islamic radicals, led by Ayatollah Khomeini. Later that year, a group of 11 Kurdish men were lined up and shot to death, accused of various crimes. Their executions at a municipal airport in Sanandaj, the capital of Kurdistan, followed a brief trial during which no evidence was presented.

A photograph capturing this event was published and eventually won a Pulitzer Prize, but the photographer's identity was kept secret to protect him. An account Saturday in The Wall Street Journal reveals the photographer's name — Jahangir Razmi — and story.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.