Freed From New York Mud, Intrepid Moves Anew

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In New York City, the historic aircraft carrier Intrepid was towed down the Hudson River after being moored for a quarter-century at a Manhattan pier. The trip was supposed to take place last month, but the ship got stuck in the mud a few feet from shore.

Veterans who had once served on the Intrepid reported for duty before sun-up. The Intrepid was scheduled to be towed to a shipyard in New Jersey for a face-lift, but it only made it a few feet before its giant propellers drilled into the mucky bottom of the river.

It had been stranded for a month, before tidal water levels were high enough to make another attempt.

In the end, the Navy came back to rescue its old ship, dredging out 40,000 cubic feet of mud from around the bottom. Hundreds of veterans and military buffs watched from shore as five tugs pushed and pulled and prodded the ship out into the river.

The Intrepid will return to its pier and reopen as a museum in 2008, with new gray paint — and without those pesky propellers.

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