British, French Honor U.S. Spy Virginia Hall Virginia Hall, a great American spy, is being honored today in Washington, D.C., by the French and British governments. The Gestapo once declared Hall "the most dangerous of all Allied spies" who had to be destroyed. And they offered a reward, on "Wanted" posters -- for her demise.
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British, French Honor U.S. Spy Virginia Hall

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British, French Honor U.S. Spy Virginia Hall

British, French Honor U.S. Spy Virginia Hall

British, French Honor U.S. Spy Virginia Hall

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6615482/6615483" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Virginia Hall receives the Distinguished Service Cross from Maj. Gen. William J. Donovan, founder of the OSS, in 1945. Courtesy Lorna Catling hide caption

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Courtesy Lorna Catling

Virginia Hall, a great American spy, is being honored today in Washington, D.C., by the French and British governments. The Gestapo once declared Hall "the most dangerous of all Allied spies" who had to be destroyed.

And they offered a reward in Wanted Posters for her demise. She was also known as the woman with a limp — a hunting accident early in life left her an amputee.

But Hall went on to become a coordinator of the Resistance movement in France; she died in 1982. Hall's niece, Lorna Catling, accepted posthumous honors presented by the British ambassador at the home of the French ambassador. Noah Adams talks to Catling.

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